Track limits freedom requires rule change, says Ecclestone

Bernie Ecclestone says that track limits could not be properly freed up this weekend because the Strategy Group didn’t actually vote on the subject, and a rule change would have to go through proper procedures.

The Strategy Group discussed the subject after Ecclestone put curbs on the agenda, and it was agreed in principle to relaxing track limits. Ferrari boss Maurizio Arrivabene was particular supportive, believing that cars going wide added to the show.

However at Hockenheim Charlie Whiting has resisted the push for a relaxation and imposed strict track limits at Turn One. He decided overnight to allow drivers a little extra leeway there from FP3 onwards, while keeping a limit in place.

Arrivabene, Toto Wolff and Christian Horner lobbied Ecclestone on the subject last night, and the last two met with him again this morning. However Bernie acknowledges what what was agreed in the Strategy Group did not go through the full process.

“What was decided was we’d give it a go and then afterwards evaluate,” Ecclestone told this writer. “Charlie sort of feels that we should stick more to the rules. There are rules that say where you can and where you can’t drive.

“It was me that put it in the agenda for the Strategy Group – the public don’t understand this and don’t care. But in the mean time we have got rules, and we need to stick to them.

“Although it was discussed in the Strategy Group and it was more or less unanimously accepted, we couldn’t do it because the Strategy Group didn’t actually vote. If they had voted it would have had to go to the F1 Commission to get approval. So it really couldn’t happen. We have to do it properly. We need to write a regulation, and vote on the regulation.”

Ecclestone denied that the saga had created some tension between the FIA on one side and and the teams and himself on the other.

“No, not really. It’s just a little bit frustrating because they think what the hell difference will it make? But when you let that go through then it’s what the hell difference will it make to something else?

“In the end it’s the stewards who make the decisions. If by chance people cross the white line, what happens? It’s the stewards who decided if they are reprimanded or not. I think the stewards look upon this as, perhaps if they don’t get an advantage, it’s not terrible. If they get an advantage, for sure they take their times away. If someone goes off because they haven’t got any choice, if they had to miss another car if you like to avoid an accident, I think the stewards will look at it and say it’s the right thing to do.”

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